Archive for the 'Uncategorized' Category

May 07 2017

Newsletter May 2017

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2017-05 Newsletter

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Apr 10 2017

April Newsletter

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We Start With…

A two minute period of silence – a moment of peace.

From the ‘Chair’

Our March meeting was a first for our group, we watched a TED talk, by Dan Dennett ‘Let’s teach religion – all religion – in schools’.  He introduced a topic important to New Zealand right now.  We had a good discussion, and interestingly decided we didn’t agree with Dennett’s particular approach – but that’s fine.  We’re all certainly more aware of the issues.

Martin Luther &

The Reformation

 

Alan Jackson

Thursday, 27th APRIL

 

St John’s Church Hall,

Cnr Wright Street

& Highgate

 

Tea and Coffee

will be available from 5.30pm

 

The programme will start at 6.00pm

 Contribution – $5

We hope to use this way of introducing a topic, using TED or other resources from the internet, at future meetings.  There is no limit of interesting speakers available to us, though it was the discussion led by Marion that followed that we found the more valuable last month.

Gretchen

gretchen.kivell@xtra.co.nz    (03) 473 0031

Next Meeting (April)

This year marks the generally accepted 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s “nailing of the 95 theses” on the church door at Wittenberg. Sea of Faith couldn’t let that anniversary pass without spending at least one meeting looking at Luther and the consequences. The National Conference in Wellington later in the year will take that theme too.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b086nzhk

 

 

 

 

 

We plan to listen to this BBC (radio) podcast and hear the discussion on what led Luther to take his step, how his thought and personality affected the course of the Reformation and whether – were he to walk into the 21st century – he might actually find himself to be a good Catholic.

The podcast bears listening to more than once and if you can find 30 minutes to tune in to it ahead of time you will be in an even better position to discuss the topic.

At Otago we are lucky to have Prof Peter Mathieson, a world expert on The Reformation, as part of the team in the Theology Dept. There is a series of lectures and seminars on this subject during the semester.

http://www.otago.ac.nz/news/events/index.html?eventtype=lecture&days=30

Several of our Group’s members have been attending the lectures and we will all agree that they are fascinating. In addition there is a Special Collection of materials in the University Library (admission free) – first floor – de Beer gallery.

Luther was a monk and Professor of Theology at the University of Wittenberg and he posed some opinions (theses) to which he invited responses and argument (like any of our contemporary Professors who write a paper on climate change for example).

Luther didn’t set out to split the Catholic Church but to reform it. He objected to the selling of indulgences (a sort of “get out of hell free” card) which were used by the Pope and some others to raise funds for themselves and the rebuilding of St Peter’s in Rome and taught that the only true path to salvation lay through the faithfulness to Jesus and his teachings. He translated the bible into the local language that people could read (German) and some people were surprised to find “that Jesus could speak such good German”. His ideas spread widely and rapidly thanks to the printing press – a new technology then which we can equate with social media today. The church did split and it responded with a catholic reformation, an inquisition and the Council of Trent (held in Trento and Bologna, northern Italy from 1545-63, it lasted through three Popes). The destabilised states of Europe entered a period called the 30 Years’ War during which power amongst the controlling factions of Europe were more to the fore than religion.

John Calvin, a humanist French theologian, was a strong supporter of Luther’s Reforms but the Protestant French Reformed community (Huguenots – 10% of the French community) were harried by the Catholics especially at the siege of the township of La Rochelle, and many fled to England (my ancestors amongst them).

In amongst the characters of the Reformation we find the Borgias, Ignatius Loyola and the formation of the Jesuits, and the ancestors of Queen Elizabeth. It was a massively turbulent time in European history with consequences for all the countries that the Europeans later colonised. It accounts for much of the violent loss of life in Ireland, the two major sorts of Christian school that we find in Dunedin as well as much rivalry on the rugby fields here and elsewhere.

May Meeting

At our May meeting we are to hear from Derek McCullough, the minister with the Unitarian Universalist congregation in Christchurch.  Unitarian Universalism is found is seventeen countries, and is particularly strong in the USA and Canada; there are UU communities in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Blenheim.

I have found people who have belonged to a UU church before coming the New Zealand, and not living in one of the above cities, have found their local Sea of Faith to meet some of their beliefs and needs.

We extend a warm welcome to all who would be interested to know more about Unitarian Universalism to join us at our May meeting, to hear from Derek and join our discussion.

 

Newsletter Editor:

Alan Jackson

55 Evans Street

DUNEDIN 9010

Ph: 473 6947

alanjackson@xtra.co.nz

 

 

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Mar 23 2017

Newsletter March 2017

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Sea of Faith – Dunedin

Exploring Meaning in Life

Newsletter MARCH 2017 and AGM details, 23 March 2017

 

We Start With…

A two minute period of silence – a moment of peace.

From the ‘Chair’

At our February meeting we discussed some of the most vexed issues of our time.  Robots, artificial intelligence, and other technologies are reducing the numbers of jobs for unskilled and semiskilled workers, and for professionals too (anything that can be learned about how you do the job by observation can be taken over by technology).  The implications of the rapidly reducing number of jobs (and thus income) lead to consideration of the possibility of a Universal Basic Income, and we explored the nature and benefits of a UBI to a community (just a little).

Religion in Schools

Marion Christie

 

Thursday, 23rd MARCH

 

St John’s Church Hall,

Cnr Wright Street

& Highgate


Tea and Coffee

will be available from 5.30pm

 The programme will start at 6.00pm

 Contribution – $5

Gretchen

gretchen.kivell@xtra.co.nz    (03) 473 0031

Next Meeting

Marion Christie will introduce a 24 minute video, a TED talk by Dan Dennett entitled ‘Let’s teach religion – all religion – in schools’, and then lead a discussion on the many points of interest raised by the video.  If you wish, you can watch the video beforehand, at www.ted.com/talks/dan_dennett_s_response_to_rick_warren

Robots

The problem with a lot of this new technology is the rate of change – Alvin Toffler called it “Future Shock”. I confess to having been able to keep up with most of it so far, although I don’t use the social media ‘FaceBook’ or ‘Twitter’ at all.

British comedian Peter Kay says his grandma calls it “FaceTube” and when the two of them went into MacDonald’s to get food she asked him to get her some “Wi-Fi” as they were free (Free “Wi-Fi”). His grandma gives him a lot of inspiration for his jokes (you can find him on YouTube and have a really good laugh).

I look forward to a driverless electric car as I get older. I like the thought of being able to get into the car and tell it to go to “Sea of Faith meeting” and then sit back until I get there. When all is over I will say “Home” and afterwards plug it in like an electric toothbrush. That may enable people to stay in their own home for longer (as I think many folk make the move to a retirement village shortly after the driving licence goes).

My new computer came with Windows 10. I was happy with Windows 7, and my old computer would link up to Bruce’s data projector – my new one has a fancy link called HDMI (that’s High Definition Multi-media Interface just in case you need to know). Anyhow, it won’t talk to Bruce’s projector so we must try to find a different one. I think the Freemasons can help.

Here is my point – we need to keep up to date with all the changes and developments. Not easy. That’s a good reason for U3A courses but also for helping each other. Sometimes a helping hand from someone just a bit more skilled than yourself is all that’s needed to help you take that next step and be able to use the new ‘phone, video, TV or whatever. Young ones seem to do things so easily – but when I was their age I stripped a car apart, gearbox, clutch, big end overhaul the lot. Many of today’s youngsters can’t do that. I know a lot of you make wonderful baking and cooking – I’m not much good at that and I’ll bet a lot of youngsters are not either. We all have skills to share – we are all still very good at something and when we get together and pool our skills, we can keep up with today’s world.

Feeding the 5000

I heard an interesting take on the story of the loaves and fishes. The speaker said that at the meeting Jesus took the food that he had and shared it around. That inspired all the others in the crowd to do the same (which they may well not have done without his inspiration and example) and there was food for all.

Helping each other, sharing what we have seems to me to be in that mold.

Luther and the Reformation

It is 500 years since Luther (the monk) made his stand against the Catholic Church. He objected to priests selling indulgences. He wanted people to be able to read the bible in their own language – German – so he made a translation from the Latin. Did he actually nail his 95 theses to the church door at Wittenberg? One programme I have listened to says that the story is apocryphal, however I’m looking forward to this series of lectures at our generous University to find out more.

I think it is high time we had another Reformation and sorted some of the awful things out – what would you put on the list if you were to write 95 theses? You don’t need to get as far as 95 – but maybe you’ll have more than that.

Pen and paper time now.

Refugees

I spotted this in a Newsletter from Opoho Church which a good friend loaned me

 

They have no need of our help

So do not tell me

These haggard faces could belong to you or me

Should life have dealt a different hand

We need to see them for who they really are

Chancers and scroungers

Layabouts and loungers

With bombs up their sleeves

Cut-throats and thieves

They are not

Welcome here

We should make them

Go back to where they came from

They cannot

Share our food

Share our homes

Share our countries

Instead let us

Build a wall to keep them out

It is not okay to say

These are people just like us

A place should only belong to those who are born there

Do not be so stupid as to think that

The world can be looked at another way

 

Brian Bilston

Newsletter Editor:

Alan Jackson

55 Evans Street

DUNEDIN 9010

Ph: 473 6947

alanjackson@xtra.co.nz

 

Read more at https://brianbilston.com/

 

AGM 23 March 2017

Hello Dunedin Sea of faith Friends

We shall hold our Annual General Meeting on our next meeting day – the Fourth Thursday of the month – 23rd March 2017 at 6pm in St John’s church hall.

The attached papers are in two formats (except the finance which is .pdf only).

The committee has offered to continue and we are delighted to have had a volunteer to swell the ranks. We are always in need of good people with good fresh ideas, so others will be welcome.

We are a very small group, and our business will not take long – so the main theme for the evening will be that of Religion in Schools – a TED video and discussion led by Marion Christie.

Gretchen asks me to stress that there are five Thursdays this month – we are on the FOURTH THURSDAY – 23rd March.

Appreciatively

Alan

2016-03-24 AGM Minutes 2017 – AGM Finances 2017 AGM – Newsletter Report 2017 AGM Chair’s Report

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Sep 26 2014

Ian Harris examines The Sea of Faith Network

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Psychology and neuroscience have for years been throwing up wave after wave of new knowledge about human life – but where does that leave religious experience? What about spirituality? Notions of the soul?
Those questions will be explored over the first weekend in October as Dunedin hosts the annual conference of the Sea of Faith Network in New Zealand.
Essentially, this is a network whose groups across the country offer a space where people can discuss religious thought and expression without the constraint of creeds and dogmas.
Members have found it a safe place to discuss unsafe things. Among them are Christians who attend a church and others who don’t.
Buddhists, atheists, agnostics – anyone who thinks religion is worth exploring for what it still may offer, even though they may differ on what that might be.
The New Zealand network was formed in 1993, four years after a similar movement began in Britain. The spark was a six part documentary series called The Sea Of Faith, broadcast in Britain in 1984. In it, Cambridge theologian and philosopher the Rev Don Cupitt, an Anglican priest, looked back over 400years of pivotal changes in Western science, philosophy and religion – changes that help to, explain why the churches no longer appeal to so many people in the West today.
The title comes from the poem Dover Beach, which Victorian poet and critic Matthew Arnold wrote after watching the tide going out below the cliffs on the coast of Kent:

The Sea of Faith
Was once, too, at the full, and round earth’s shore
Lay like the folds of a bright girdle furl’d
But now I only hear
Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar,
Retreating, to the breath
Of the night-wind, down the vast edges drear
And naked shingles of the world.

The series aroused much interest in Britain. TVNZ rejected requests to screen it here, although eventually it went to air via Massey University’s former Educational TV service.
People drawn to the Rev Cupitt’s approach began meeting in Britain to discuss the ideas, then held a national conference. New Zealand theologian Sir Lloyd Geering initiated a parallel network here.
2014-09-26 ODT Ian Harris.docx Page 2
The Sea of Faith is not a mass movement and the network does not proselytise. In New Zealand it comprises about 500 members and participants, who meet in 18 groups around the country. It is valued by people, lay and clergy alike, who value the freedom to question and explore ideas, including some that would discomfort, even shock, people in local churches.
Accordingly, the Sea of Faith makes no attempt to define what members are expected to believe. The focus of the British network is ‘exploring and promoting religious faith as a human creation’. The New Zealand network describes itself as ‘exploring religious thought and expression from a non-dogmatic and human-oriented standpoint’.
It also affirms the continuing importance of religious thought and practice ‘as a vehicle for awe and wonder for the celebration of key social and spiritual values’, drawing freely on the Judaeo-Christian heritage without being bound by it.
Twelve years ago, the Australian Broadcasting Commission found this of sufficient interest to send a television crew to the network’s conference in Timaru, attracted by the presence of Rev Cupitt, Sir Lloyd and British Buddhist scholar Stephen Batchelor. It afforded an excellent opportunity to get a fix on the Sea of Faith at a time when a similar network was getting off the ground in Australia.
In the resulting Compass programme, the Rev Cupitt cut to the chase. “I think the traditional world religions are coming to the end of their historical 1ife,” he said. “The question is what should take their place?
“Some people would say a globalised eco-humanism, a kind of environmental humanism. I’d have a stronger, element of philosophy and spirituality than that. I want religion to break with ideas of power and tradition. I want it to become more matter of freedom, of spirituality, of the way people relate to each other in the here and now. I believe religion has a future, but it will be very different from the past”.
This points not to religion turning its back on modern life, as some urge in all religions, but to engaging contemporary thinking across a wide front, reassessing its own traditions, and reinventing itself in the light of both.
The church has done this more than once during its 2000-year history, and it marked a new beginning. The tide came back in.

Otago Daily Times
Faith and Reason
Friday 26th September 2014

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Apr 10 2014

Newsletter April 2014

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091011.SOFimageSea of Faith – Dunedin
Exploring Meaning in Life
Newsletter APRIL 2014

Next Meeting

Dr Taneli Kukkonen

‘Islam, faith, and theological realism’

Thursday, 24th APRIL

Highgate Church buildings,

Maori Hill

Tea and Coffee will be available
between 5.00 and 5.40 pm
Food will be available
$7 for as much as you want to eat plus rent
or
$4 if you come for the meeting only
The programme will start at 6 pm

*****

We Start With…

A two minute period of silence.

*****

From the Chair

Those who attended last month’s AGM [thank you :-) ] will know you have a small committee doing all the behind-the-scenes work for our Sea of Faith meetings. Most things run like clockwork but we need some help in two matters:
We need extra help each meeting, from 5 – 6pm, with serving and washing up. We’d like to have different people helping each month, so please do offer if you can. :-)
The SoF library is now without a home. The role of Librarian has a physical aspect – moving six boxes of books to and from each meeting – as well as providing spiritual and intellectual refreshment. I will discuss this vacant position at our May meeting.
Gretchen

A Key Diary Date

Lloyd Geering at Mornington Methodist Church on Wednesday April 16th at 7.30pm $5 contribution.

Our Next Meeting

Dr Taneli Kukkonen hails from Finland and is Senior Lecturer in Islamic Studies at the University of Otago. His principle research interests lie in the history of Islamic theology, philosophy, and mysticism. Some of us who attend U3A were extremely impressed by his address on aspects of Islam recently. Taneli will focus on ‘Islam, faith, and theological realism’ and will take questions too. Since it is school holidays, Taneli’s six-year-old son Sulevi, will be along for a rare opportunity to see his Dad in action.
Those of you who wish to look at the text ‘Black Elk Speaks’ will find this site useful.

Thoughts from a Member
Should the Sea of Faith be more outward looking?

The discussion about whether the Sea of Faith should become more outward looking and take a public stance in addressing issues is an important one and has been raised by a number of members in recent years. I would suggest that individual members of Sea of Faith are free to be as public and vocal as they wish on any number of fronts and this is already happening. However, I would strongly oppose any move towards Sea of Faith speaking out as a united voice on any matter. It may attract attention to the group but far from increasing the membership I believe many present members would leave. The reason for this is that we are a diverse group that has no set dogmas or belief systems, or common views on issues such as euthanasia, abortion or oil drilling to name a few. We exist to explore ideas of a spiritual or ethical nature together and, most importantly, members must feel free to express themselves and be listened to with respect. As has been said it is “a safe place to explore unsafe things.”
Many have been attracted to Sea of Faith over the years because they have been relieved to find a place where they are free to explore ideas amongst a group of non-judgmental and supportive people. I believe Sea of Faith will exist for as long as there is a need for such a group. As individuals we may well be moved, as a result of our involvement with the group, to take a more active role on specific issues we are passionate about. To do so in the name of Sea of Faith would destroy its very raison d’être.
Marjorie Spittle

More Equality

Pope Francis has made himself very popular with a great many Christian folk, Roman Catholic or not, as he has adopted a much more modest life-style in the Vatican than previous Popes. Pope Francis wants a “poor church for the poor” (ODT 18th March 2013). He has called for financial reform in the world economy (ODT 18th May 2013), has taken action on alleged money laundering in the Vatican (ODT 17th June 2013), said that gays must be integrated (ODT 31st July 2013), likened the Vatican court to leprosy (ODT 9th October 2013) and has removed one senior bishop in Germany for building sumptuous offices and living quarters for himself at a cost of around $60 million. Pope Francis is leading from the front and ‘walking the talk’ in a way we have seen few leaders do in recent times. This gives him enormous integrity and māna in the eyes of the world. If he keeps this up he will rank alongside Mahatma Ghandi, Martin Luther King Jr and Nelson Mandela. We can only give him our fervent hopes and good wishes for success and in whatever way we can, join in his crusade to bring about the Kingdom of Heaven into this world, now, rather than in a mythical place after we are dead.
The Archbishop of York, John Sentamu impressed many in Dunedin during his recent visit. He was outspoken on the issue of poverty and looked at poverty here under our noses as well as in the poorer parts of the world. Poverty is not just a matter of having very little money to live on, but being oppressed in any form, whether it be by bullying, family violence, lack of enfranchisement – that is a spiritual poverty which is also corrosive. In New Zealand we have two wage indicators which get regular attention in the ODT: the Minimum Wage and the Living Wage. When I read that people are asked to work for a wage that is less than the cost of living a decent life I can only think of slavery and oppression. We will have moved a long way towards a more just society and a realisation of the Kingdom of Heaven when those two indicators stand at the same level.
Alan Jackson
Newsletter Editor:
Alan Jackson
55 Evans Street
Opoho
DUNEDIN 9010
Ph: 473 6947
alanjackson@xtra.co.nz

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Oct 13 2013

Newsletter October 2013

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091011.SOFimageSea of Faith – Dunedin
Exploring Meaning in Life
Newsletter OCTOBER 2013

Next Meeting

Thursday, 24th October

Ideas from the 2013 Conference

Highgate Church buildings,
Maori Hill
Tea and Coffee will be available
between 5.00 and 5.40 pm
Food will be available
$5 for as much as you want to eat plus rent
or
$2 if you come for the meeting only
Kitchen volunteers:
Marjorie and Bruce Spittle
The programme will start at 6 pm

*****

We Start With…

A two minute period of silence.

*****

From the Chair

For our September meeting Ian Fleming ran a very interesting session on Prayer. Did you find yourself saying something you’d never said before? I did. Did you hear things you’d never known or thought about before? I did. These are hallmarks of a good conversation. I hope you enjoyed your conversation as I did mine.

Thanks Ian

Gretchen

Next Meeting

Nigel Leaves was a keynote speaker at the 2013 Sea of Faith conference in Hastings, 4th to 6th October. Nigel is based in Brisbane, on the staff of St Francis Theological College and as a Canon of St John’s Anglican Cathedral, where he is responsible for adult theological education. His address

Too many stories! Which one should we tell?

was very well received by the 100+ members at the conference. The paper provides an interesting framework for SoFers to understand where Christianity and post-Christianity is today, at least in the Western world.
At the October Dunedin SoF meeting Marjorie and Gretchen will present Nigel Leaves’ seven ‘stories’, with plenty of time for discussion and contribution.

Gretchen

Dunedin Group News

It’s always good to welcome a new member to our group and this month Mick Chagger (you’ll recognise his London accent) enjoyed our company and we hope will be back next meeting. We missed Wilson Daniel’s company but it is good to hear that he has had both knees fixed and his convalescence is going well.
Bruce Spittle does an expert job of serving out the food each month and later ensuring none is wasted. If the food is eaten by 5.30 p.m. then the kitchen volunteers have a better chance to be all clear for the start of the meeting. Tea and coffee can still be enjoyed after that but can we try to hand in all dishes by 5.45 p.m. please?
We have some newly-printed brochures which publicise the work of the Sea of Faith nationally and at a Dunedin level. If you would like to take one of these to give to a “prospective member” or an enquiring member of the public, please pick one up at any meeting. They are in colour and a bit too expensive to spread around with gay abandon.

Maryan Street has withdrawn her “euthanasia bill”, as she is aware that 2014 is election year and she wishes any discussion of it to be removed from any electioneering. She will resubmit her bill in the new Parliament and hope it is again drawn for debate.

With great sadness I record the passing of a great friend and a dignified lady who was a long term member of our group. Pen Whitaker slipped away peacefully at the Otago Hospice on 3rd October. Pen worked out her arrangements well before the end came and there will be an opportunity to celebrate her life and friendship on Saturday 16th November at 11.30 at Holy Name Church.

Last Meeting

18 folk joined in with Ian Fleming who led an extremely lively discussion on the very personal subject of prayer. He posed three questions which we went into groups to tease out our responses and then shared our thoughts.

  • How or when did you first begin to pray?
  • Are you aware of a time, or times, when your praying, or your attitude to prayer, changed? Can you say what that change was?
  • Some of us might still pray in some places, or at some times. Some mightn’t. Some might even miss it. What process has brought you to where you are now?

The wide variety of responses showed the range of thinking amongst members and also the journeys that we have taken, from (in some cases) being taught what and how to pray in a home of Christian and regularly-worshipping parents to others who have discovered the power of prayer for themselves as they have grown and faced life’s challenges. Prayer takes all forms, and for some the ritual of clasped hands, closed eyes in a silent setting has been replaced with an acute awareness of the inter-connectedness of life whilst looking at the beauty of a garden or talking to a friend.

Happiness

There is a “Happiness Index” used to measure the well-being of society, and the World Happiness Report 2013 was released in September following a world-wide survey of governments to measure the well-being of their societies. Here is a paragraph from the introduction…
“There is now a rising worldwide demand that (government) policy be more closely aligned with what really matters to people as they themselves characterize their well-being, More and more world leaders are talking about the importance of well-being as a guide for their nations and the world. The World Happiness Report 2013 offers rich evidence that the systematic measurement and analysis of happiness can teach us a lot about ways to improve the world’s well-being and sustainable development.”

So wrote Professor Jeffery Sachs (Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General).
Virtue Ethics (of the days when Christian Values held sway) have been replaced by a doctrine of utility once economists came on the scene.
They developed a “utility theory” in which each individual’s utility (or well-being) is determined by the possession and consumption of material goods, mainly through market purchases. By the 20th century, utility theory is marked by an unrestrained consumerism, where advertising and PR fill the public space, even the pulpits in many churches.

Ring any bells?

*****

Newsletter Editor:
Alan Jackson
55 Evans Street
Opoho
DUNEDIN 9010
Ph: 473 6947
alanjackson@xtra.co.nz

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Jun 27 2013

Personal Perspectives on the Jesus Seminar

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Personal Perspectives on the Jesus Seminar

 

There are three ways in which I would sum up the Jesus Seminar and its contribution to Jesus studies.

Continue Reading »

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Mar 28 2013

Annual Meeting Minutes March 2013

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The Sea of Faith Network: Exploring Meaning in Life

091011.SOFimage

http//:dsof.blogtown.co.nz

____________________________________________________________

MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF THE DUNEDIN SEA OF FAITH 28th MARCH 2013

The meeting opened Continue Reading »

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Mar 03 2013

Annual Meeting 28 March 2013. Reports.

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 Sea of Faith Dunedin

Chairperson’s Annual Report March 28th 2013

I am pleased to report that Continue Reading »

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Feb 28 2013

Euthanasia

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Euthanasia, Physician-assisted Suicide, and Spirituality

Dr Richard Egan
Dept of Preventive & Social Medicine
Dunedin School of Medicine
University of Otago

richard.egan@otago.ac.nz

28 Feb, 2013

Outline

•Introduction – and the lens through which I see? Continue Reading »

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Mar 09 2012

Power Point presentation at Annual Meeting

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Geoff Neilson presented the new statement of the purpose of the Sea of Faith and introduced the “Charter of Compassion” instigated by the religious historian Karen Armstrong, for discussion. Continue Reading »

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Jul 18 2011

July 2011 Newsletter

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091011.SOFimage
Newsletter

 

July 2011

 

Dunedin

 

Mai Tamimi spoke to us; the title of her presentation was:

From the Holy Land to New Zealand:

A Challenging but Exciting Journey.

 

About herself she said: I am currently a finalist PhD student at the Geography Department at the University of Otago. My PhD focus is on Young Palestinians and Contact with Nature. I am also a secretary for the Abrahamic Interfaith Group in Dunedin. I am a Palestinian and came to NZ with my family in late 2008 so as to carry on my studies. Before coming to NZ, I worked for more than 10 years in Palestine with different development international organisations such as Save the Children US and Save the Children Alliance, OXFAM GB, the World Vision and Seeds of Peace. During that time, I worked with children and women in particular being the most marginalised groups. I am married and have two daughters and one son. Continue Reading »

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Apr 18 2011

April 2011 Newsletter

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091011.SOFimage

Newsletter

 

April 2011

 

Dunedin

Programme:
Lynne Baab spoke to us on:

Spiritual Practices:

Why the growing interest? How do they “work”?

Lynne explained:
“In Western countries, people in a variety of traditions increasingly engage in spiritual practices such as fasting, sabbath keeping, meditation and contemplative prayer, praying with icons, stations of the cross, and intentional hospitality, to name only a few.
I have written about spiritual practices in the Christian tradition, and I’ll share what I’ve learned about the sources of the growing interest and the impact of practices on individuals and communities – drawing mostly on the Christian tradition, but also mentioning the role of spiritual practices in other religions and among people with no formal religious commitment”.

Continue Reading »

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Nov 15 2009

November 2009 Newsletter

Published by under Newsletters,Uncategorized

091011.SOFimage

Newsletter

November 2009



Dunedin

Kia Ora,

Programme:

Where are you on the Sea of Faith ?

Again, for our last meeting of the year, we asked everyone to speak for three minutes. This time the question was:

If some close friend asked you about the Sea of Faith, what would you say to them based on your own experience?

We could choose to respond in terms of our own voyage – what changes had there been in our faith, or our understanding, in the last year or two?
Or we might prefer to speak more about the organisation – what was good about it, and what were its weaknesses, as we saw them?
And, as usual, we were free to say “Pass” if we wished. Continue Reading »

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Sep 25 2009

2009 Conference photos, Hamilton.

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Click to enlarge
103

Waikato Diocesan School for Girls, Hamilton

Continue Reading »

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